Leonardo Dicaprio Cheers

Leonardo Dicaprio Cheers Meme | YOU MOCK THOSE WHO PRAY AFTER TRAGEDIES. CONGRATULATIONS. YOU ARE A DOUCHEBAG. | image tagged in memes,leonardo dicaprio cheers | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
8,608 views, 146 upvotes, Made by JFL1 5 months ago memesleonardo dicaprio cheers
Leonardo Dicaprio Cheers memeRe-caption this meme
Add Meme
Post Comment
reply
[deleted]
5 ups
*PROCEEDS TO MOCK* | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
reply
5 ups
Distracted Boyfriend Meme | INSULTING EVERYONE AND BEING OFFENDED AT THE SAME TIME DOUCHEY IMGFLIPPERS BEING A LITTLE COMPASSIONATE | image tagged in memes,distracted boyfriend | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
reply
2 ups, 2 replies
Praying over tragedies is fine.

Preventing tragedies is much better. How come we're the only nation with a school shooting every week?
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
We’re not the only country with a school shooting every week. We might be the one where people pretend there is a school shooting every week though.
reply
1 up
Futurama Fry Meme | YOU'RE RIGHT THERE'S ACTUALLY TWO SCHOOL SHOOTINGS A WEEK | image tagged in memes,futurama fry | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
Or more, statistically speaking...
https://www.google.com/amp/amp.timeinc.net/time/5159039/florida-school-shooting-parkland
reply
0 ups
The other countries just aren't trying hard enough.
reply
5 ups, 1 reply
Success Octavia_Melody | MY COMMENT GOT DOWNVOTED INTO HIDDEN STATUS THAT MEANS I PISSED OFF THE IRRATIONAL PEOPLE | image tagged in success octavia_melody | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
reply
[deleted]
3 ups, 1 reply
I saw your comment and appreciated the way you said it. I'm a Christian and I know you are not, but always am grateful for the way you are always respectful in your comments. I really do like hearing your thoughts/opinions:)
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Thank you for those kind words :) I strive to be courteous and respectful as much as possible, but I know I am not always so. I enjoy hearing from you as well, for the same reasons :)
reply
[deleted]
0 ups
:)))))
reply
3 ups, 2 replies
I think most people's issue with it is that a lot of people pray and do nothing more. Christians should not invite such mockery by being selfish, but should instead combine their prayers with action
reply
4 ups
I think most people that take issue to prayer do nothing but post on social media to be cool.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
It isn't just Christians who pray. And I agree, it'd be great if all of us took even a few minutes out of our day to do something active, whether it is write an article expressing suggestions on how we believe things may be changed for the better or voice our opinions/suggestions to education leaders. In the meantime, prayer does not hurt nor take away from one's concern in the matter.
reply
1 up
Well said
reply
1 up
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Science can't prove something morally right or wrong, so many people turn to religion as a means of determining good and evil; and in turn by turning to religion they prey to a reputed divine being who has the power to make certain changes beyond human capability.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
I don't think it's so much about determining right and wrong as it is wanting to feel like they have some control over things that happen in this world, especially things that seem chaotic and beyond their control.
reply
2 ups
It's not about the feeling of being in control, so much as it is the belief that there is someone in control, that everything isn't just spinning around by happenstance and is the result of a purpose, often beyond our ability to understand. It's a belief that the ends, though indiscernible, justify the means, no matter how horrific the tragedy in the moment.
reply
0 ups
ezt a szerelmemre m
reply
1 up
Mmm... I actually mock people for praying instead of, you know, doing. Still, I do it in my mind, without wording, out of regard for their fragility.
reply
6 ups, 5 replies
Show me that prayer actually does something productive and maybe I won't be so quick to mock those who do so
reply
14 ups, 4 replies
Show me that mocking prayer actually does something productive and maybe I I won’t be so quick to mock those who do so.
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
The productive thing that mockery does is to let people know that prayer is a waste of time.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
So is memeing, playing on apps on our cell phones, and watching My Little Pony. 90% of what we do with our lives is a "waste of time"
reply
2 ups
I would agree with that statement, yes. We all need something to keep our minds occupied between our birth and our death.
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
Also, you don't seem to understand how the burden of proof works. If someone says prayer works, the burden of proof is on them to prove that's true. It's not on other people to prove it's false.
reply
7 ups, 1 reply
Funny you bring up the topic, I just heard Steve Scalise during an interview last night talking about that very subject and how he felt the prayers on his behalf were a tremendous help for him during his post-shooting recovery. I seem to remember Reagan saying the same. At worst you can only reduce it to a placebo effect.
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
I agree that it can have a placebo effect, like Tombstone said. But that still doesn't prove it works in and of itself. If it works as a placebo, it's the person's mind doing it, not the placebo or prayer itself.
reply
5 ups, 1 reply
But that's exactly what they are saying. It may not, in and of itself help, but it helps because people believe it helps. It has a psychological benefit (much like meditation). And it isn't harmful. It helps individuals work through grief. It's like saying "get over it, don't bother to grieve, because grieving won't help."
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
People shouldn't be encouraged to believe things that are false just because those beliefs are comforting or reassuring. That's why many people believe their loved ones are in heaven and they'll see them again someday. It's comforting, but it's not reality. People should prefer reality over false beliefs.
reply
4 ups, 3 replies
You are exactly right that belief should be based on truth instead of comfort. That is why I believe in Jesus Christ even though it is uncomfortable to admit that I am a sinner in need of salvation. His life, death, and resurrection cannot be denied. The evidence is overwhelming and demands a verdict based on truth, and not on personal preference, comfort, or convenience.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
I'm on here defending the value of prayer, and even I'm rolling my eyes at that comment.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Replying to your comment below:

You make it sound as if religious belief is mostly benign, except for the specific cases where it leads to people like ISIS committing terrorist attacks against others. I disagree. Religious belief can be more harmful than it may seem. There are people whose religious beliefs have caused them to withhold medical treatment from their children because they believed prayer would cure them. Look it up online. Children have literally died from treatable conditions because their parents, the very people charged with their care and safety, chose prayer over medicine. People have been in life-threatening situations and believed that God would save them, and instead they died.

And that's not even getting into people who do commit murder because they feel their God or belief system command them to. I have talked to two different Christians who have told me (face-to-face, not online) that they would kill a person if they felt God told them to do it. I don't know about you, but that's a pretty scary thought.

Do we uphold false beliefs as virtuous because they *sometimes* have beneficial results? Even feces can be used for fertilizer, but at the end of the day, it's still shit.
2 ups
Religion IS mostly benign.
Most muslims are peaceful.
Far more religious people accept (and even seek out) medical assistance than reject.
The most common medical procedure that is rejected is vaccines, and that's not due to religion, but bad science.
As for religion being shit, some people are even turned on by shit. Until they start flinging it at me, it's not my business.
reply
[deleted]
1 up
Well said YoungGrasshopper :)
reply
2 ups, 4 replies
I can and do deny that Jesus rose from the dead. I find the evidence for the supposed resurrection to be incredibly paltry. Not a single historian who lived at the same time as Jesus made any mention whatsoever of his life, ministry or miracles, let alone any resurrection. All we have is the four gospels, and even those accounts don't agree with each other, nor do they give any hint of having been written by eyewitnesses.

I find the evidence for Christianity to be so lacking, that I am willing to bet my life on it.
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
That is a dangerous bet to make. I do not say this to intimidate, but rather out of a sympathetic fear. I'm not going to try convincing you here and now, because I already know that an internet argument will not convince you. What I would recommend is reading "I Don't Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist". Chapters 9-12 in particular have to do with the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus and the writing of the Gospels. If you are so certain you are right, then you don't need to be afraid of being proven wrong. You can even read it just to laugh if you want, but I hope you will be open-minded enough to at least consider the possibility. I will be praying for you :)
2 ups
I have read that book, and I find the arguments of Frank Turek and Norm Geisler to be very poor. The same goes for Josh McDowell.

I know you are concerned about me, but I don't think you need to be. Pascal's Wager can be turned around on you, too, don't forget.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
Mankind is in denial. In large part over the last 150 years people have struggled to take theology out of the picture. The people who made the atheist faith widely excepted did so for a bad reason that makes sense. They didn't want to admit their sin. It takes a lot to say (and really mean) I'm a bad person. I'm a sinner. And because of that and man wanting to live for himself, mankind started more and more widely to reject God. I know you don't believe in any substance of prayer, and I'm ashamed I didn't do it before, but I'm going to pray for you every day, and I'll try to remember.
1 up
Atheism is not a faith, and I'm not an atheist because I want to sin. If I don't believe in leprechauns or magic pixies, is that a faith, too? It doesn't take faith to not accept an unfounded claim someone makes. I think people like you say things like that because they're trying to rationalize in their own mind why someone would reject their belief system.

If someone doesn't believe what you do, it can't possibly be because your belief system is false, can it? Surely it must be because they're horrible sinners who want to retreat into the shadows and hide themselves from the justice and wrath of a holy and righteous god? Except that that's not the case. I don't reject Christianity because I'm in denial. I reject it because I don't believe the evidence supports its claims.
reply
0 ups, 1 reply
Technically, you can't prove that leprechauns don't exist. You and I believe that there's no such thing as them, but to prove it we'd have to see every place on Earth at once. Just as I can't prove God is real, you can't prove he isn't. Everyone has beliefs. And you are a horrible sinner. I am too. And everyone is.
0 ups
You're right, I cannot prove that god doesn't exist. But if someone makes a claim, they then have the burden of proof to show that that claim is true.
reply
0 ups
Your claim, which is mostly held in pretty recent time, is that God does not exist. I believe he does. We can't really get to anything more than that. :)
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
The reality is that everyone is going to die and in the grand scheme of things even a mass shooting isn't even a blip on the radar. Life is meaningless and it would be great if a asteroid struck the earth, because if everyone dies at once, no one lives to "suffer" the loss. Reality is bleak and gives us little to no reason to even carry on.
reply
1 up, 2 replies
I couldn't reply to your comment lower down so I'm doing it here. I really like the conversations I have with Octavia regarding faith, because it actually forces me to examine what I really believe. Although my faith lens closer to the everyday Christian side, I still have my own beliefs that would make many raise at least one eyebrow. Having faith is not really the hard, I would almost go as far as to say you believe, but have trouble reconciling it. I've spent much longer in that gray area than out. In my opinion that's where church and the Bible fit in, although at this point I'm not big into either, but I also feel like a person can find their meaning on their own as well, it just takes longer :)
reply
1 up, 2 replies
"How do you reconcile drawing the distinction between the patient and the faithful?"

I don't believe I understand the question.

As far as placebos, they serve a purpose during clinical trials and experiments, but I don't think a doctor would deliberately prescribe placebos if real medicine were available.

"I don't think you can separate not being cruel and heartless from intentionally tearing down the beliefs of others."

I think it's possible, especially if your desire to point out false beliefs has as its foundation the best of intentions. Tearing down the beliefs of others just to be mean could be compared to vandalism. But showing someone that their beliefs are false and then showing them what is correct would be like tearing down an old structure in order to build a better one. Tearing apart an old house to remodel it is not vandalism.
1 up
But you have the same perceived problem as those you wish to "correct". You don't have tangible proof of non-existence.
1 up
I think the problem is that you are taking a "one or the other" approach to this. Religion or faith should not replace practical real world solutions. When that happens it is a problem. Prayer should be in addition.
For instance if there was a comic book store, you could tear it down to build a hospital (obviously the hospital is better). But if you can build the Hospital next door without tearing down the comic book store, you can still have both.
While there is some bad religion, not all of it is bad.
There is bad science, which says vaccines cause autism, that vitamin C can cure heart disease, or that a special diet can cure cancer. These bad apples don't make science worthless as a whole. They just show you need to be selective in what you accept as truth.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Thank you for those kind words :) And I enjoy these discussions as well. I enjoy talking to people with views different from my own, and seeing what they believe and why.

I forgot to reply to your cancer ward comment. If someone showed improvement after a placebo regimen, I wouldn't personally want to be intentionally cold or heartless, but I certainly wouldn't object to them being told the truth.
1 up
Not just kind words but truth. I found myself this morning stepping outside and thinking about our conversation here. Again, thinking through a response forces me to examine closer what I believe and why.
How do you reconcile drawing the distinction between the patient and the faithful? Using the same analogy, is your position then, that placebos not ever be used again? I don't think you can separate not being cruel and heartless from intentionally tearing down the beliefs of others.
As for using Isis and other extremists as example of why religion is bad, is lazy or not well thought out reasoning. History is loaded with causes and groups that have in one way or another had their original purpose, or their name usurped to do harm or provide cover. Communism which is political not religious gives us many examples, occupy wall street was usurped by anarchists to give cover to their aimless rioting, and so on.
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
A correction, I didn't say it WAS a placebo, I said at worst you can only minimize it as such.... big difference. You also did not address the examples I provided, you don't have to agree with them politically to agree that these are intelligent human beings, along with many doctors scientists and other intelligent believers.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
Being intelligent doesn't necessarily mean they're right. Richard Dawkins and Carl Sagan are/were very intelligent, but I'm sure you would say their views on god were wrong.

If Scalise and Reagan said that prayer helped their recoveries after being shot, that's a personal experience that I can't verify or corroborate. I know that scientific studies have been done regarding praying for sick people, and the results have been unremarkable.
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
I understand there are intelligent non-believers, my point was that people aren't being suckered into a religious belief. I think I know you well enough to say that you would not walk into a ward of cancer patients, some showing positive results after a placebo regimen, and take it upon yourself to change their minds about what is helping them. Which makes me wonder why you would come down so hard on religion and fight so hard to separate others from something that brings them joy, comfort and maybe healing?
reply
2 ups, 2 replies
I try to separate people from false beliefs, even if those beliefs are comforting. Which is more desirable: to have comfortable yet false belief about reality, or to have an uncomfortable yet true belief about reality? I do not do a person any favors by encouraging them to persist in comfortable falsehoods.
reply
2 ups, 2 replies
Why is that even your business? It has always puzzled me that atheists are the ones most likely to have the god complex, driving them to save others from themselves.
2 ups
I concur. I'm agnostic (leaning towards atheist). If there is no god, there is no "eternal punishment" for falsely believing in one, and if it helps make people "happy" and gives them a sense of "purpose" why would I want to take that away from them (except in the cases where they use their beliefs to harm others). It seems cruel to take that away from them.
If there is no god then everything is a cosmic accident, and life and death are truly meaningless. (As you can probably tell, I'm not exactly happy, I am actually jealous of people with faith).
0 ups
I do it because I care about people. If you knew someone who believed something that you knew was wrong, wouldn't you want to correct them, so that they wouldn't continue to be wrong? Or do you draw a distinction between false beliefs that bring a sense of comfort and peace, and false beliefs in general? My reply to boredmeme down below should explain a little more.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Re: False beliefs
It depends on whether or not those false beliefs are harmful. Plenty of people "know" trivia that is incorrect. Since it is just trivia, it's not worth my time to correct them.
Personally, I believe that Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster exist (I imagine you don't). I know, logically, they may not. Since I am not wasting time (well, maybe watching a few you tube videos or looking at websites) or resources trying to track them down, or using that belief engage activities harmful to myself, family, or others, I'm sure you would agree my belief is harmless. You probably wouldn't waste your time trying to convince me they don't exist.

Now when prayer is used INSTEAD of using known solutions, it can be harmful. Such as rejecting medical treatment in favor of praying. However, praying in addition to medical treatment causes no harm.
Prayer is also used when people cannot actually do anything to help. "Sending prayers" is essentially sending sympathy.
1 up
I see your point about harmless false beliefs. You're right, I won't try to convince you that Bigfoot doesn't exist, because that is a belief, which at the end of the day, although possibly false, doesn't really affect your day-to-day life.

In my younger days, I did believe in things like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster. Nowadays I am much more skeptical, although I cannot say for an absolute fact that they don't exist.
reply
6 ups, 1 reply
I never said prayer works. I said mocking prayer makes you a douchebag. You are proving it true.
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
Praying is like crying. It is how many work through pain and trauma.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
that's funny. crystal meth works just as well.
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
Except crystal meth has long lasting effects (such as holes in the brain).
reply
1 up
and praying has long lasting effects as well (such as voting republican and thinking it's still the 1950's)
reply
0 ups
reply
1 up
reply
10 ups
Even if it has no more or less empirical value than Transcendental Meditation or Psychiatry, if someone's condition is improved by it, then it serves a purpose.

The fact that you are so wrapped up in your own bias against religion that you cannot see this, is a 'you' problem.
reply
1 up
He's got you there buddy.
reply
1 up
Might I suggest that the science of neurotheology could lend itself to this discussion. Prayers and meditation have demonstrable and measurable positive responses in the participants of studies in this field.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3968360/

There are obviously challenges in this field to stay objective, but there are plenty of published studies that reproduce each other's findings. Long story short: The brains reaction to meditation and prayer are very positive on several fronts and measurable using cat scans.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
It reminds me of onion boi (onision) who, after a youtuber/singer got shot at a concert and millions of adoring prayed for her to live (yet she died), Onision acted like a total ass and said that "Y U NO MOURN EVERYONE ELSE WHO DED?". Though he's meant to present realism, he did it in such bad taste and inconsideration that he was basically mocking those who's idol and star got rushed to the emergency room and tragically died. I'm not saying prayer works, but I am saying that respecting those who wish to pray for others is a good thing to do instead of being inconsiderate and mocking them.
It might not be the most effective thing to do, but it's the most considerate thing to do.
reply
1 up, 1 reply
Fair point
reply
1 up, 2 replies
reply
1 up, 1 reply
reply
0 ups
reply
1 up, 1 reply
No no it doesn't work

i.imgflip.com/20spac.gif (click to show)
reply
1 up, 1 reply
reply
1 up, 1 reply
reply
1 up
Flip Settings
Leonardo Dicaprio Cheers memeRe-caption this meme

Created with the Imgflip Meme Generator

Show embed codes
IMAGE DESCRIPTION:
YOU MOCK THOSE WHO PRAY AFTER TRAGEDIES. CONGRATULATIONS. YOU ARE A DOUCHEBAG.
hotkeys: D = random, W = like, S = dislike, A = back