Time lapse day in the Arctic

4,192 views, 140 upvotes, Made by AndrewFinlayson 3 months ago gifssundayarctictime lapsephotography
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18 ups, 3 replies
Go home sun, you're drunk,
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9 ups
LOL
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9 ups
Well done!
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2 ups
made w/ Imgflip meme maker
Teletubby sun goes to college...
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15 ups, 2 replies
Great GIF, you can challenge the flat-earthers to create one for the antarctic
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9 ups, 2 replies
This disproves the flat earth because in the flat earth model, the sun orbits the artic at a set distance from the earth. If this was the case, some cities would burn alive at 12:00
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5 ups
I know it's seen as a cliche but Americans just don't get irony.
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0 ups, 1 reply
Uhhh no, it disproves the globe because this does NOT occur in Antarctica during the opposite equinox. If you can prove it does, link up an uninterrupted time lapse video of 30+ from ANY observatory in Antarctica...ready? GO!
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0 ups
How stupid are you? I literally just told you that in a flat earth model the sun should remain at about the same place in the sky when you're in the artic and clearly that is not happening. Oh, and here's the footage: https://youtu.be/-v2uF5CF6Tg
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6 ups
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10 ups, 1 reply
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4 ups, 1 reply
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2 ups, 1 reply
Lol, good one :-)
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1 up, 1 reply
Thanks, likewise!
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1 up
Lol :-)
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10 ups, 4 replies
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8 ups
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4 ups
:)
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2 ups
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9 ups, 1 reply
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1 up
Just a guess, hopefully you're not locked down with IE like I am at work. I've heard imgflip is wonky on older versions of IE, I have had no trouble using Chrome.
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9 ups, 2 replies
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2 ups
:)
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8 ups
This is amazing. I lived near Alaska for a year and saw some long days.
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9 ups, 1 reply
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2 ups, 1 reply
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1 up, 1 reply
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0 ups
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8 ups
Excellent gif.
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7 ups, 1 reply
Cool. Evidence the earth isn't flat.
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3 ups
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7 ups
Nice one
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7 ups
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8 ups
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6 ups
Love this!!
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6 ups
i.imgflip.com/22t52u.jpg (click to show)
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4 ups, 2 replies
Great GIF, now if only ballearthers could prove this actually also occurs in Antarctica by taking the #AntarcticMidnightSunChallenge and linking a +30 day uncut time lapse video of the sun not setting in Antarctica...????
#FlatEarth
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4 ups
Thanks, that gives me an idea for a meme :)
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1 up, 1 reply
You would see essentially the same thing, except with more ice. If it looks like this north of the arctic circle, it would look the same south of the Antarctic circle.

I’m still waiting for photographic evidence of that huge ice wall around the edge of the flat Earth.
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0 ups, 1 reply
I’m still waiting for photographic evidence of #ProgressiveDeclination of a sloping spheroid that matches the supposed radius of 6731km! DOES. NOT. EXIST.
#FlatEarth
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0 ups, 1 reply
We already have ample photographic evidence that the Earth is not flat, you just don’t want to accept it
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0 ups
That is a COMPOSITE IMAGE
NOT a photograph! Were you born and raised in #Gullibleville? #OctaviaDerpody????https://m.facebook.com/11thirteen2015NWO/posts/1701718180040898
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4 ups
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3 ups
there is no true sunset, thats freaky
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3 ups
*clicks* Noice.
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3 ups
The Arctic is f**king beautiful in the summer.
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4 ups, 1 reply
Everyone here is saying this debunks flat earth, but I don't see how that's the case. Could someone explain it to me?
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2 ups, 1 reply
if the earth is flat, why would the sun never set during the summer but never rise during winter? just doesn't make sense.
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2 ups, 1 reply
If the sun is rotating in a circle over the earth, with the north pole in the middle and Antarctica around the edge, this would make perfect sense. The summer would simply have a tighter orbit (that is, closer to the middle and therefore in the northern hemisphere) while the sun would be orbiting further south in the winter.

Granted, that doesn't necessarily mean the earth is flat. It just means the 24-hour sun doesn't disprove it. I've been looking for ways to disprove it for a while now, but I've kinda ended up in the middle playing the devil's advocate for both sides lol.
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0 ups, 1 reply
there are periods of regular day/night cycles and polar day as well. what doesn't make sense to me about the flat earth is the fact that antarctica and the arctic are usually opposite in the day/night cycle, but looking at a flat earth model, i see that it should be completely different from that. if the sun is in a rotation above the earth, then the arctic should always be sunny and only certain parts of the arctic should be dark/light. that doesn't make sense, because antarctica is usually entirely day or night. i think the time zone is pretty much universal there. and with the arctic, it has a day/night cycle, a sophisticated one, but it isn't always sunny or dark, and the flat earth model implies that it would be.
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1 up, 1 reply
I'm not sure exactly what you mean, I think you may have accidentally swapped "arctic" with "antarctica" a few times. In your post, do you mean to say that the north pole is usually always sunny or always dark, and that antarctica (the south) has a very sophisticated day/night cycle? If so, then that actually fits with what the flat-earth theory would expect if the sun is orbiting above the earth and its light has limited range. During spring and fall, the cycle of the sun would be roughly over the equator, while during the summer it would be tighter around the northern center and giving the arctic circle a roughly 24-hour sun. Meanwhile, during the winter the sun would rotate a wider circle further south, giving more heat to Australia and giving short times of light to different parts of Antarctica as it passes by.
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0 ups
Precisely @Young_Grasshopper
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3 ups
Follow the bouncing Sun!
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3 ups, 1 reply
Awesome. It's one thing to see still photos of "the land of the midnight sun", but seeing it in GIF- form REALLY puts it in its proper perspective.
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2 ups
Thanks! The furthest north I've ever been was Alaska, but it was below the Arctic Circle. I think night was about 4 hours long on that trip.

Just read on Wikipedia the Arctic Circle is not fixed and is currently moving north about 15 meters a year.
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3 ups
LOL
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3 ups
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2 ups
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1 up
That pretty cool
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