XatomX (81955)
Joined 2016-09-10
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Human Rights in politics
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0 ups, 2m
Your accusation of me using a circular argument relies on an appeal to popularity (and appeal to absolutes) fallacy: "the fact that nobody else agrees with your premise". Aside from that, your assertion is just plain wrong.

As for your answers to the questions I asked, you seem to be confusing "surplus" with "unlimited resources".
Human Rights in politics
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0 ups, 2m
You're just repeating appeal to popularity fallacies, this time in the form of supporting your position with the phrase "widely considered".

How about answering my questions (which I asked above), instead of repeating fallacious arguments which I previously called out as nothing more than fallacious arguments…?
Human Rights in politics
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0 ups, 2m
The world owes you nothing more than the right to be left alone, if you're not infringing in the freedoms or liberties of others.

Is food a human right? What about dessert? What about sugar-free? What if someone thinks gluten is evil? Where do you draw the line?

What if someone is 90 years old, in good health, but they're diagnosed with a disease that will kill them within five years if it's not treated… Treatment will cost $1M.

Is it a "human right" that society pays for their treatment?

How should society factor that case against kids with cancer, and limited health care budgets?

Worse, doesn't this create a moral hazard, since people would not be concerned about keeping themselves healthy if their healthcare is a "right" that society is responsible for providing?
Human Rights in politics
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0 ups, 2m
Other than appeal to authority and appeal to popularity, what is the basis of a "human right" to services and provisions?
Human Rights in politics
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0 ups, 2m
Appeal to authority fallacy.
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