There's free speech, and then there's being a whiny b*tch.

There's free speech, and then there's being a whiny b*tch. | OH YOU FEEL THAT NOT SALUTING THE FLAG AND DISHONORING VETERANS WHO SERVED WHILE YOU MADE MILLIONS PLAYING GAMES IS A FORM OF FREE SPEECH? G | image tagged in memes,kill yourself guy | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
3,233 views, 45 upvotes, Made by H2O 24 months ago memeskill yourself guy
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6 ups, 1 reply
Bad Luck Brian Meme | DOESN'T STAND UP FOR NATIONAL ANTHEM LOSES TO THE GREEN BAY PACKERS | image tagged in memes,bad luck brian | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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2 ups
Bad Luck Brian Meme | DOESN'T STAND FOR THE NATIONAL ANTHEM KARMA'S A B*TCH | image tagged in memes,bad luck brian | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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6 ups, 1 reply
X All The Y Meme | BURN ALL THE KAEPERNICK JERSEYS | image tagged in memes,x all the y | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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4 ups, 1 reply
Leonardo Dicaprio Cheers Meme | I CAN THINK OF A LOT OF THINGS TO DO TO IT BUT BURNING THEM IS A GOOD START | image tagged in memes,leonardo dicaprio cheers | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
I was so happy when I saw people burning his jersey. It actually gave me a little hope for our country
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1 up
Ancient Aliens Meme | NEXT, GIVE KAEPERNICK TO THE ALIENS FOR SOME "TESTS" | image tagged in memes,ancient aliens | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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4 ups
If one is to expect honor, one must extend it.

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4 ups, 1 reply
But Thats None Of My Business Meme | MONEY TALKS. BULLSHIT WALKS. HOW MUCH OF HIS SALARY HAD HE DONATED TO A CHARITY? | image tagged in memes,but thats none of my business,kermit the frog | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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2 ups, 1 reply
I don't really care if he donates to charity, or what he does in his personal life.

My point is that the national anthem is about AMERICA. Stop trying to make everything about your own agenda and realize there are some basic things we do in this country no matter what we believe.
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0 ups
That has been the agenda of some for a long time, to remove the rallying points of the nation, the common ground. There are those who seek to negate the power of the people by telling idiots like Kaepernick its okay, and even encourage them.
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3 ups, 2 replies
But I suspicion I'll be in the lonely minority in this commentary stream.
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1 up, 1 reply
It's not an interpretation of rights. The media wet thier pants when donald trump didn't do it, but now they're making all kind of excuses for this guy cuz he's supporting their agenda
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1 up
If Trump did do it then I'd support his right and freedom to do so, despite my opinion of him as a fool. Everyone on all sides interprets things according to their political agenda. It's called election season.
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0 ups, 1 reply
You must have checked back in the 1600s. There is no "right" to "do whatever you want for whatever reason." What we do have is a right to free speech, but there are certain limitations there. Part of the genius of the founding fathers was to leave people with a voice to speak out with. To give an instant voice as to what is and is not acceptable in our society. Just as Kaepernick had the freedom to protest and not be jailed for his actions, we have the freedom to protest his protest and here in this meme you have the freedom to protest our protest. See how that works, probably not because your understanding of "rights" isn't all that solid.
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1 up, 2 replies
Actually you're correct, there is no right to do whatever you want, say like kill a person for the hell of it. But basically after that what you're saying is what I'm saying, to a point. Kapernick protests and you protest his protest and I protest your protest and that's what freedom of speech is. Where I see differences between us is that I don't see there being 'an instant voice to what is and is not acceptable in our society'. You have the right to condemn Kapernick for what he does, but to claim 'rallying points of the nation' is mere hubris. The great thing about America is that it is a nation of ideals, not definitive mores. There are no 'basic things we do in this country no matter what we believe' as H2O claims above. This country was not founded on set standards, but on concepts, primarily of liberty and individual autonomy. There are no 'certain limitations' to free speech because America needs a common ground. If we claim the need to coalesce around a few sung words or acting in a certain way when a certain ritual is performed then we are no better than any country which forces it's citizenry into strict cultural traditions. America is a country of no absolute norms; it's a country of freedom of thought. The 'agenda' here in this commentary stream is of the anger of those who feel they are losing power in 'their' country; but their real problem is a country living up to its ideals and leaving them behind.
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1 up, 1 reply
This country WAS founded on something. We call it blood, sweat and tears. We salute the flag to honor those who died creating a country in which we have free speech. It's about respect for your country, something which most people seem to trample under the feet of "social justice". Don't like the country? Cool. But if it doesn't represent your values then what the hell are you doing raking in millions of American dollars playing an American game protected by the American military and, ironically enough, protected by the bloodthirsty police he seems to hate?
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0 ups
People died fighting for this country because of the ideals for which it stands, not because of shared rituals. I love this country because of what it stands for, not because I live with fellow citizens in the same geographical area. If I were to simply adore America because of it's basic structure and shared culture then how could I criticize Russia and Putin for their actions (and lack of ideals) when many of their citizens have bought into Putin's nationalist - and oppressive - prejudices? Many of the ideals of America would easily fall under the rubric of 'social justice'. As for Kaepernick feeling he must protest what he considers his loss of freedom from police actions, while I disagree with his overall general argument and think his chosen form of protest is pointless, I strongly believe he has the right to that protest. That definitely falls under freedom of expression. As to him taking millions, well, that's his payment because of his skills, and because of his rights and freedoms as a citizen he can make his thoughts known. If you worked under me and I decided to fire you because I disagreed with your politics I would definitely be in the wrong. This country was founded not on cliches like 'blood, sweat and tears' but on ideas of individual autonomy and freedom, protected by the constitution. The military and police are defending people AND those ideas.
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1 up, 1 reply
I didn't say the limitations were directed around how someone acts during a song or other tradition, I just merely pointed out free speech is not without some restrictions. The government does not force us to participate in the traditions like the pledge or standing at the anthem. However all of us have the right to speak out when we find someone being disrespectful and react to it in a peaceful manner. As far as my other statement regarding rallying points, it is a long proven method for creating unity amongst people. If you had watched the 1976 US hockey team and heard the (now arguably over-used) U S A chants in that stadium, you could not argue that these do not exist to unite us. As a nation if we cannot come together to stand for our nation for something simple as listening to a song, or stating 4 simple lines, what hope do we have of moving on and standing together on bigger more important issues. The difference here and third world dictatorships will always be enforcement of participation. That is what has and what will continue to separate us. Kaepernick is still walking free, still able to work as long his employer cares to deal with the backlash of his actions.
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1 up, 1 reply
Speaking out against disrespect does not qualify as a restriction. It qualifies as free speech plain and simple. A restriction against free speech would be not being able to use a child in a display of a sexual manner. But those are basics, like yelling "fire" in a crowded theater when there isn't a fire could get you legitimately sued if there are casualties in the rush to exit. Americans rallying for national sports teams or players is a legitimate expression of togetherness and common interests. But I believe cultural and political cohesion should come from the consent of the individual, not from some sense of expected norms. As Americans I believe that we should come together not to defend rituals of patriotism but to defend the ideals that patriotism is supposed to engender. There is no one United States of America as much as there are 300-million-plus Americans. We are Americans because of our ideals, not because we live in the same geographical area. Russia is a country. Saudi Arabia is a country. The United States is an ideal. To reduce our country to shared traditions and culture is to reduce it to the level of those nations, and thus it would be difficult to hold the USA above them in the global arena (which I do). Strangely enough I think you and I are trying to arrive at the concept, just from different directions and different, well, traditions. You do present your arguments well. And for that I'll respect your side of the debate.
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0 ups, 1 reply
I am all for speaking out, obviously as that is what we are both doing. Words and actions has, does and will continue to have consequences in the sports world. Howard Cosell's "look at that little monkey go" immediately comes to mind. This man can do what he wants to do, but he needs to be willing to accept the consequences of his actions. I would differ with you that sport is a great uniter. Sports create cliques under a larger umbrella. Just ask a Mets fan to go cheer for the Yankees. Arguably the Olympics can unite a nation, but these are nationalized cliques under a world sports umbrella. Once again in the Olympic sports world Hope solo refers to her competition as cowards, and is suspended from the Olympic team. I haven't seen outrage regarding this. My point being double standards are everywhere and Kaepernick should not get a pass because his color and religion are in the minority.
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1 up, 1 reply
Good argument. I would agree that free speech means that others can criticize you, primarily because that's their free speech. I don't know if I would qualify that as 'consequences' as much as acceptances that others have the right to counter and contradict you. I must admit you got me on the Hope Solo issue; I was glad she got the suspension for her very unsportsmanlike comments. I've heard the NFL doesn't have rules concerning standing for the anthem but I imagine Solo signed a contract for the national team that allowed for her suspension. (She also got suspended from her league team in Seattle then willingly left for the season.) She also faced criticism from her teammates for it, though polite criticism. I imagine that Kaepernick is engendering more passion because the national anthem is something many people feel more allegiance to and passion for. I love this country for what it stands for, which is its ideals rather than its rituals. I stand for the anthem, but mainly out of respect for others. Of course I'm a white heterosexual male so I'm about as un-oppressed as you can get. I don't believe Kaepernick should get a pass for his race, I think he should be allowed to express himself, which he's doing, and because it's getting so much press and social media action it's having the effect of creating debate, which I imagine is part of what he's intending.

You're right about sports in general. I'm a fan, but I view sports as entertainment. Too much passion put into something that should be fun.
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1 up, 1 reply
You almost sound apologetic for your race and orientation, maybe you had an easy ride in life but that doesn't mean we all do. When I've been oppressed, it has been by the choices I've made. When I've been successful it is by the effort I've exerted. I think Kaepernick is an even better example of that. A black/white muslim able to rise to a starting NFL quarterback, something only 31 other people in this country can say. I think that puts him in a very elite group. He could have allowed himself to be oppressed but instead he worked harder than everyone else to achieve. He has no reason to apologize for rising to excellence, no one ever should. He should also be able to protest what he sees as injustices. He should also appreciate and respect the country that gave him the chance to excel AND use his position his position as a platform to speak out. This was a calculated divisive move, he spent time thinking about, understanding, and determining that the outrage would put him in the headlines. The same headlines a Florida state player got by simply sitting down with a lonely autistic boy and having lunch with him. The same headlines the LSU football team got by helping the people around them during massive flooding and the list goes on. It boils down for me to cheap stunts to gain headlines or actually putting in the work to make a change.
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0 ups
I never apologize for something I can't control. (And I'm a working man on a dock and I knew lack of money in my familial youth.) Because Kaepernick makes a shitload of money doesn't qualify his freedoms in any way. Nor does working hard for what you get. As with all African-Americans he would've endured racism at several points. He also speaks out for others. Others who do not necessarily ALLOW themselves to be oppressed but have been. His fame allows for greater press. He calculated it? Fine. Again, no qualifications on the exercise of his free speech. And those other sportsmen were wonderful for what they did, but again this does not qualify Kaepernick's speech. I guess where I differ with you is that I believe as an American I have freedoms to use as I want, and that I don't have to 'should appreciate and respect the country' - which I personally do - as an expected and demanded constraint. As American citizens we have freedoms and no other absolutes.
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2 ups
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2 ups
;)
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1 up
Welcome to the Internet
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0 ups
Nothing to do with this meme, but your points right now make a phone number that my phone offered to call.
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0 ups, 1 reply
Next time you're in a bar and a game comes on, see how many barflies stand. Next Super Bowl party, see how many guests stand. You listen to the ball game at a backyard barbecue, see who stands.

The false patriotism brought about because he did not stand for the anthem. The false outrage is because people don't like his message, and are outside of their comfort zones.

He did not burn the flag.

He did not blow up a government building.

He didn't even flip the bird.

It is up to every American to make America great. This action now has us talking, but the fake outrage needs to now be directed towards rectifying the problem that prompted this man to take action with a Gandhi like inaction.

You'd rather he lead a group of armed insurgents into your neighborhood to destroy it?
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1 up, 1 reply
I tell you what, when he gives up all worldly possessions and devotes his life to the poor and not a game, when he completes his first fast, I may put him in a paragraph with Ghandi.
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0 ups
Why must he hive up his career and wealth to make a statement? Would you do such to promote patriotism?

He is in the correct position to do so. How many people in the bleachers did not stand? Why didn't they stand.

He was able to send a message to the world that this country has a problem.

Also, for giving up his millions, just wait. Endorsement deals will likely start disappearing, and that's where the big bucks are.

I was actually proud that the NFL has backed up his actions. No fines or suspension because he didn't break any rules. While he has teammates that may squabble about it, the 49ers fall right in line with him.

It will be an interesting season as fans choose up sides during the Anthem. Those that recognize there is a problem and remain seated and those that would rather ignore it.

Like I said, it's fake patriotic outrage. Didn't hear dinkum about it the first time he did it.
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OH YOU FEEL THAT NOT SALUTING THE FLAG AND DISHONORING VETERANS WHO SERVED WHILE YOU MADE MILLIONS PLAYING GAMES IS A FORM OF FREE SPEECH? GO KILL YOURSELF
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