You have to be of a certain age to remember the commercials. The Teaberry shuffle

164 views, 18 upvotes, Made by Swiggys-back 11 months ago gifsbeyond our controlteaberry shufflead parodyfuneral
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3 ups, 1 reply
First World Problems Meme | IT'S JUST NOT THE SAME WITHOUT THE MUSIC | image tagged in memes,first world problems | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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1 up, 1 reply
I shared it on Facebook, and forgot to tag my son. It seems Ed O'Neil is from my hometown and went to highschool around the corner from us. I knew some of the people in his class. The reason I should have tagged my boy? He's married to Ed's cousin.
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2 ups, 2 replies
Hunh??? I'm sorry.......what was the question?
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Just Rambling. Happens with old age. Whenever I hear or think of the song, my brain wanders off in its own.. oh shit! There it goes again! DON'T LOOK, ETHEL!

Too late. Flashed her right there in front of the cheap seats.
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... | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
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2 ups, 1 reply
Correction. I was thinking of another GIF I posted. Ed O'Neil one. I work up too early this morning. That hasn't even featured. Going back to bed
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2 ups
Pleasant dreams!
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:)
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2 ups
The Doublemint twins are even older than me!
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1 up, 1 reply
Lol!
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1 up, 1 reply
Thanks, DayRick. If you get a chance and like cheesy humor, check out the Beyond Our Control videos on YouTube. I still regret I was too young to join the group when I lived here. (By the time I was old enough, we'd moved back to Ohio)
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1 up
I will indeed!
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1 up, 1 reply
Must admit I don't know it, but an upvote anyway for the effort.
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2 ups, 1 reply
It was an ad campaign in the mid-60s for Clark's Teaberry Hum. They hoped to start a dance craze, but it tanked. It was only good for one person to do not couple.

Here's one of their ads. https://youtu.be/Fk11Acjofu8
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0 ups, 1 reply
Oh those crazy people of the '60s. :) I was born in 1965 so not quite within my cultural memory, but watching Laugh-In nowadays I remember characters and sketches that I must of last seen when I was 4 or 5 years old. Amazing now the brain works; can't remember the name of someone I met last week, but I remember old Trevor & Gladys sketches from more than 45 years ago.
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Yeah, Who could forget TYRONE F. Horneigh (I had to check the spelling on that) and Gladys Ormphby. I recall their wedding like it was never happened.
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Pronounced 'hor-NAY'. ;) I didn't even realize they had names until I started watching the shows again recently. I remember all Arte Johnson's stuff, and Lily Tomlin's operator and Edith Ann in the big chair, and a whole bunch of comedic actors like Joanne Worley and Ruth Buzzi and Henry Gibson (not to mention Goldie Hawn) lesser knowns like Alan Seus (the first time I probably saw someone act 'gay'), Judy Carne, Dave Madden, Johnny Brown, and Dennis Allen, all of whom would appear in other shows later. Hell, I forgot Richard Dawson was a member of the cast in the last couple years but still could remember some of the characters he played after seeing it again. Often cheesy and dependent on templates - the party, 'quickies', the news - but still better than most comedy around nowadays. :)
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While not as edgy as The Smothers Brothers, it was a perfect reflection of our times. ABC attempted to compete against them and the show was so bad it was canceled during it's first episode. Larry Hovis, also from Hogan's Heros, also appeared was a regular. Since many of the comics had done the nightclub/vaudeville circuit, some were familiar with other comics from that era. Sammy Davis Jr was on the show and did a routine "Here Comes Da Judge". Old Vaudeville routine done by Dewey "Pigmeat" Markham. Because of racial inequality, he spent most of his life on the "Chitlin" circuit of Vaudeville. Even numerous appearances on Ed Sullivan in the 1950s kept folks from knowing who he was. Emerson TV threatened to pull their sponsorship from the show on episodes he appeared. They were afraid that it would hurt their sales in the south. Sullivan refused to back down and Emerson continued advertising. Read his biography Here Comes The Judge.

Yes, there were a lot of other Artists and celebrities on the show. Long after he was elected, Richard Nixon would pop up in pre-filmed fillers saying "Sock It To Me" For a liberal show, it had the cream of the Hollywood conservative crop appear consistently. Anything you see on the current episodes has had some of the dated material edited out, although that really needed to be in there. Especially News of the Future. You bet your sweet bippie!
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1 up, 1 reply
Yeah, that Sammy Davis, Jr judge routine was a classic. And I didn't realize Larry Hovis was on it until recently (though I remember Richard Dawson's bits). And for some episodes of the first season Eileen Brennan was too! The other night they showed the episode where the cast asked questions of William F. Buckley - or 'Mr. Fuh-Buckley' as Ernestine the Operator put it - and he had the humor for it; and they had Martha Mitchell on the episode last night. For a few episodes they had Jack Riley, who was Mr. Carlin on the Bob Newhart Show, just playing LBJ. Amazing what the sentimental, trivial mind can pick up by watching it.

I don't think there's much editing if any on the episodes I've been watching. The commercials only last about a minute or minute-and-a-half (the commercials themselves would fit perfectly for the times themselves with cheesy products and production) and I know there wasn't as much commercial time back then but there must be close to 50+ minutes of show shown. They show News of the Future, and about a third of the references are dated, though as a student of history I get almost all of them. It's just fun to watch and I usually catch most of the shows as I'm sitting down to dinner.
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1 up, 1 reply
I'll have to see if I can watch it on the internet.

It was interesting how they did the shows. It was something they pieced together. Arte and Ruth would do several routines, enough for a month or two of shows, next day one or both would show up for their solo segments. Party scene and joke wall would be done the one week when the players were all assembled. It was the perfect gig for a comic on the road a lot,or involved in other projects. Sammy's scenes were usually done when he wasn't in concert in Vegas or touring. Same with everyone.

The key: keep it movig. If you didn't get the last Joke, the next one would come so fast that you forgot you didn't get the last one. Hee Haw followed the same formula. both highly profitable shows.
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1 up, 1 reply
The irony of what you last said is that when I was that young I watched whatever my parents wanted to watch; besides Laugh-In there was also Hee Haw, watched by my father, which is odd considering he was never a country music fan. I can still sing the opening part to the 'pain, despair, and agony' song. :)

Yeah, I like the quick pace of Laugh-In. I have patience for good entertainment, but it seemed like they were willing to risk more for the reasons you mentioned: if it doesn't work then the next laugh will be here immediately. The filming does appear choppy; sometimes the more minor guest stars - those who appear and throw off a one-liner here and there - don't interact with anyone, and sometimes there seem to be leftovers from the episode before. As Gary Owens said, it was all pre-recorded. I've been watching it for a few months and it seems the best shows are the ones from about the middle part of it's run, I'm taking an educated guess from about '71-'73. They put in all the pre-pre-recorded stuff where they'd take out the camera into public and do short, mostly silent bits, and those are usually worth a chuckle, and also it seems the cast from the time, even if minus Arte in the second half of that period, was the best. I've nothing if not gained even more respect for Lily Tomlin, she was brilliant on the show.

I watch here in Portland on Decades network, which I think originated as a digital 'dash' network (like here on channel '6-3') and it's also on cable. They may have a YouTube presence.
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1 up, 1 reply
I know some of the old Smothers Brothers shows are on YouTube. Those were even better than Laugh-In because the skits averaged longer than the Farkle Family. Steve Martin was one of their writers, but they wound up winning an Emmy for writing after they were canceled
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I'll need to look those up.
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Upvoted
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1 up
Thanks. My friends on Facebook actually got the video of this. It was based on a local TV show in South Bend and ran every winter/spring for like 6-8 weeks. The show was called Beyond Our Control and was a production of an area Junior Achievement program in conjunction with Notre Dame's TV affiliate, WNDU-TV. It garnered a lot of positive press, although much of the humor was local versus National. My favorite was their parody for a now defunct men's clothing store.
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WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID THE TEABERRY SHUFFLE
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