Is This A Pigeon

Is This A Pigeon Meme | MIDDLE AMERICA KOREAN, THAI, INDONESIAN, CAMBODIAN, VIETNAMESE IS THIS JAPANESE OR CHINESE? | image tagged in memes,is this a pigeon,asian | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
share
1,573 views, 25 upvotes, Made by Octavia_Melody 5 months ago memesis this a pigeonasian
Is This A Pigeon memeRe-caption this meme
Add Meme
Post Comment
reply
6 ups, 2 replies
Mocking Spongebob Meme | WHAT ABOUT FILIPINOS? | image tagged in memes,mocking spongebob | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
lol I was telling the story not long ago of when my dad and I were in California disposing of my great aunt's estate. The next door neighbor was a black man, nice guy but overly sensitive about race. And he assumed I was racist since I'm from the south and white. We were selling some of my aunt's stuff at a yard sale and he was interested in some dinnerware with Japanese art, but he kept calling it Chinese. I corrected him and and said it was Japanese. He said, "Chinese, Japanese, like there's any difference" and was dead serious. I was internally facepalming lol
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
WOW | made w/ Imgflip meme maker
Earlier today (well yesterday, since it's after midnight) I was driving through Vegas. I remembered back to a fun trip I took there with a couple of my friends back in 2006 (4th of July also). I went to a nice sushi place in Caesar's Palace and noticed that the sushi chef was actually Japanese. I had been to a Japanese restaurant in Iowa and the sushi chefs there were Chinese. The average Midwesterner probably couldn't even tell the difference, but being from a largely Asian area (San Jose), I easily could.

I had a question. A little while ago you said you're okay with same-sex marriage now, but in the past you weren't. What was your reason for being against it back then? I'm not coming down on you, I'm just curious.
reply
5 ups, 1 reply
I grew up in a very religious and conservative family, and have always been very politically and socially conservative. So naturally LGBT rights were something I was close minded to. But my wife has always been more open minded and has a number of gay, lesbian and bi friends she's kept up with from high school and college etc, so over time she's been a positive influence on me.

We also have friends who have a daughter who was born male, but decided to transition to female. Through seeing the unconditional love and support they have shown her, and seeing what a beautiful and happy young woman she's become, it really opened my eyes and helped me begin to have a change of heart towards the LGBT community. I then began to research transgenderism, and read and heard stories of people with gender dysphoria. And I have come to see that some people truly don't fit the standard molds they were born into, and yet they can be beautiful well adjusted and normal people. I certainly respect the views of those who still hold conservative views on LBGT issues and I understand where they're coming from. But for me it's just been a process of life experience and becoming more open minded as I've gotten older and realized that people are just people with lots of variations, and those differences are to be appreciated, and not something to judge and condemn people for. :-)
reply
5 ups, 3 replies
Thank you for that explanation. That truly was very well-said :) I think a lot of people who view certain groups negatively often times have never actually gotten to know people from that group, to see that they're just normal human beings like everyone else.

I would only disagree with one part. When it comes to people who are strongly conservative on LGBT issues, I respect their right to hold and express their opinions, but I don't respect the opinions themselves. I would never take away someone's right to freely express their beliefs on any issue, but that doesn't mean I respect the beliefs.
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
Yeah I get your point. But I guess my point is that for many, (not all, some are just closed minded bigots), they truly do have deeply held religious convictions regarding those issues, and from their perspective they aren't stepping on anyone's rights. I've been there and had those same deeply held beliefs, so I understand the mindset. (It's sort of like going into a primitive tribe that practices cannibalism, and thinking how could they, they are horrible. And while it is awful and should be stopped, if it's all they know from generations, I can't fault them for something like that.) I can respect other's beliefs on LGBT, while appreciating the fact that I've been able to see a greater truth, and just hope that their minds might become open someday too.

My parents for instance would give the food off their plates and the shirts off their backs if a homosexual or trans person was in need and they could help. But they'll never support gay marriage or transgenderism because it's deeply ingrained in them that it's wrong. I can't fault them for that because it's how their worldview was hard wired, and in fact I respect them holding to their convictions despite now disagreeing with them....
reply
1 up, 1 reply
"...for many...they truly do have deeply held religious convictions regarding those issues, and from their perspective they aren't stepping on anyone's rights."

Sadly, many people like that don't even think LGBT people should have equal rights. I know of many people who think it should be completely legal to deny an LGBT person a job or apartment or house, just because they are LGBT. It's horrible.

"I...just hope that their minds might become open someday too."

I hope so, too.

I've talked to people who have told me they don't hate black people, but they wouldn't let their children date them because they believe interracial relationships are wrong. No offense, but that same mindset is what came to mind when you described your parents. You say you can't fault them for their views because that's how their worldview was hard-wired. Would you say the same thing about someone who was racist? Would you respect a racist person for "holding to their convictions"? Clearly I'm not saying your parents are racist, I'm just making what I think is a valid comparison.

The way your sister's family is being raised sounds horrible. Protecting kids from harmful influences is one thing, but that sounds like borderline abuse. My uncle and aunt raised their kids in a very sheltered, strict Christian upbringing. They always seemed kind of "off" to me as a result. Homeschooled (at least until high school), only allowed to watch Christian entertainment, etc. When Katy Perry was a child, her mom wouldn't let her eat Lucky Charms, because she said that they represented Lucifer.

I guarantee that sort of extreme sheltering your sister is doing will backfire big time when their kids grow up and move out. They will enter a world they are completely unprepared to deal with: financially, mentally, emotionally, socially, intellectually, etc.

I have an aunt I believe is likely a lesbian, but I can't prove it. As for myself, the only family members who know I'm bisexual are my dad and two brothers. My dad and younger brother are totally accepting of it, my older brother couldn't care less either way, lol. I have a couple relatives on my dad's side who I believe would be accepting if they found out, but I rarely talk to them. I have no plans to tell anyone on my mom's side (including my mom, at least not anytime soon).

"I guess the good thing is...the vast majority of people today are coming around, and LGBT is becoming normal and accepted as it should..."

I agree :)
reply
1 up, 1 reply
imgflip.com/i/2dd0su

I don't know if you saw this but I submitted it yesterday. This guy is 24 years old and has some of the most archaic and most naive beliefs. But he has a good heart and I truly like the guy despite having to facepalm at him every day lol. I mean he's a true believer in chemtrails lol. But I realize he had a very sheltered upbringing and gets his news and worldview from an echo chamber, and it's all he knows. And he's never hateful acting about his beliefs.

My grandfather was one of the most loving and humble people you can imagine, and he would help black people, give them rides, help them fix farm equipment etc. But he called them "coloreds" or the occasional N word and we would cringe when we heard it. But he was born in 1912 in South Carolina, so it's only way he knew how to view things. From his perspective he wasn't racist, it's just the way things were. If he had been born in my time and had my life experiences I believe he would have believed more like me. My point is not to excuse bad beliefs, or to not hold people accountable for them. But to not hold their ignorance against them as people. I've learned to always try and view things from other's perspectives and through the prism of history. It's easy for Javier to judge and condemn Val Jean for stealing a load of bread, but he wasn't the one who's family was starving. That's probably not the best reference here, but my point is that for myself, I try and put myself in someone else's shoes before judging their hearts and beliefs.

And yes, undoubtedly my sister's kids are irreparably damaged and have essentially been neglected and abused educationally and socially, and it breaks our hearts more than you can imagine. Especially so since we weren't blessed to have kids of our own.

But there's little we can do because if we try to address it, they shut us out and we lose contact with them. We were essentially estranged for over a year after I confronted them on some things. But we have been able to have a bit of positive influence on the kids over the years and they've gotten some knowledge and experience they never would have had if not for us. So there's that I guess.

Anyway, good discussion. Need to crash for a couple hours lol
reply
1 up
Hopefully your coworker will grow out of those silly beliefs :)

It's a difficult situation. On the one hand you feel bad for people who grew up in an era where racism was just normal and everyday, and you realize that that's all they knew. But on the other hand, you have to wonder why they didn't "snap out of it" and realize that just because things were that way, it didn't make it right.

I had two people I worked with in Iowa (at different jobs) who used the N word casually a couple times, like it was no big deal. I'm not really a confrontational person, but I told them both that it wasn't cool, and that my girlfriend (at the time) was black.

"I've learned to always try and view things from other's perspectives and through the prism of history."

That's a good thing. I should do that more often.

Hopefully you can continue to be a positive and educational influence on your nieces and nephew. I can't imagine how tough it must be, knowing that, in one sense, you and your wife are maybe their only hope for some semblance of normalcy.
reply
2 ups
ingrained in them that it's wrong. I

It's the same with my sister and her husband. They are so closed minded and hard wired against so many things, that they have really screwed their kids up. My niece is 22, doesn't have a driver's license, never been on a date or had a real job, doesn't have a high school or equivalent degree, and has only ever seen TV like the Andy Griffith show or Little House on the Prairie. Her sister is 16, and brother 12, and he can barely read and write and has zero social skills or basic knowledge. And they won't leave them home alone despite the oldest being 22.

Interesting side note... My dad had been taking the 12 year old to a monthly men's dinner at a church he's involved in, and my brother-in-law went with them once. The speaker was talking about homosexuality, but of course from the perspective that it's wrong, but how to deal with it and approach those who are gay etc. My BIL got very upset and won't let his son go any more because he didn't even want him to know about homosexuality. Talk about abusive over sheltering lol. I say if you have convictions that its wrong and want to teach your kids that, then fine. But for God's sake don't just try to hide them from reality and pretend it doesn't exist. Ironically there's a guy in their church they love and let the kids interact with a lot. But I used to work with him and know him well, and he's a closet homosexual. Oh the naivety and irony lol.

The trans girl I mentioned above was a scholar in high school and college, and now has a good job and is engaged to a great guy and doing great things with her life. I look at her and all the wonderful things she's doing with her life, and then look at my nieces and nephews who are being "raised right", yet have accomplished nothing and it makes me so sad for them. Such a striking contrast which disproves a lot of closed minded beliefs...
reply
2 ups
Interestingly, my brother's daughter I believe will come out as a lesbian before long, and that's going to make the family dynamics very awkward... My parents will be heartbroken and disapprove, but show her love and a certain acceptance regardless. My sister and her family will disown and disassociate. But my brother will be fine with it as will me and my wife, and we'll continue to love and accept her as always :-) Its crazy how family can so greatly differ on these things lol

Anyway, sorry to ramble. I guess the good thing is, the reality is while some minds will always remain closed, the vast majority of people today are coming around, and LGBT is becoming normal and accepted as it should, despite louder cries from the holdouts. :-)
reply
1 up
LMAO
reply
4 ups, 4 replies
It's true (Picard facepalm here). Dunno whether to consider myself 'racist' or just having great taste. XD
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
reply
3 ups
XD
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
:-)
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
At least Chinese women :D
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
Yeah I'm pretty much insatiable when it comes to that... lol
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
reply
4 ups, 2 replies
:D
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
lol :-)
reply
3 ups
:D
reply
1 up, 1 reply
lol
reply
0 ups
:D
reply
4 ups
reply
3 ups, 2 replies
lol
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
:-)
reply
3 ups
Haha!
reply
2 ups
:D
reply
3 ups
lol :-)
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
Great taste! :)
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
Agreed!!! :D
reply
3 ups
;D
reply
4 ups, 1 reply
...along with a future offer. ;-) lol
reply
3 ups
;)
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
After spending some time in New York, it becomes easier - but people should be exposed to different cultures and populations IN SCHOOL. That might help too. ;-)
reply
3 ups, 1 reply
Yup! My high school was more than half Asian :) today that same school is probably about 80%+ Asian.
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
Are you in the Mid-West or on a Coast?
reply
2 ups, 1 reply
I grew up in San Jose, California :)
reply
1 up
So there were plenty of different cultures.

In some areas (no names) there are only ONE type. And they don't take kindly for different folks.

You can't really blame ALL of them, as there are not many economic reasons to go where there are no jobs or opportunities. Or get a decent education. These thins are *usually* located in cities and their suburbs.

Maybe in a few years when the Internet matures, there might be hope. :-)
reply
1 up, 1 reply
lol My whole life! I do understand that people who aren't exposed to those different cultures will automatically initially assign "Japanese or Chinese".
reply
1 up
:)
Flip Settings
Is This A Pigeon memeRe-caption this meme

Created with the Imgflip Meme Generator

IMAGE DESCRIPTION:
KOREAN, THAI, INDONESIAN, CAMBODIAN, VIETNAMESE; MIDDLE AMERICA; IS THIS JAPANESE OR CHINESE?
hotkeys: D = random, W = like, S = dislike, A = back
Feedback